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Today we honor our RISE students and graduates conducting scientific research relating to public health.
 
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Meet SSAWRN, RISE's Sub-Saharan Africa Water Resources Network.

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We celebrate our RISE women scientists!

Click the photos to read more about the research that these amazing women are doing.

Alan Anderson

Fialho Nehama of Mozambique has completed his PhD at University of Cape Town and is currently employed by the Eduardo Mondlane University, his country’s leading research institution. As a member of the WIO-RISE network, he was able to do much of his work at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, where he benefited from access to advanced instrumentation, high performance computation facilities, and especially the mentoring of Prof. Chris Reason and colleagues in the Department of Oceanography.

Alan Anderson

Jane Tanner, a doctoral graduate at Rhodes University and member of the SSAWRN network, grew up about half an hour outside Durban, South Africa. From her earliest years, she was keenly aware of the natural environment, and followed a habit of childhood exploration with a range of environmental studies in school. Jane did her undergraduate studies in the United Kingdom, beginning at the Open University and subsequently moving to the University of Reading, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in environmental geology.

Alan Anderson

Tinotenda Shoko is one of many young Zimbabweans who have managed to find opportunities both outside and inside their country during times of limited resources. He joins other RISE students and faculty from Zimbabwe who have brought high levels of energy, talent, and optimism to their fields – often as true leaders in their scientific activities.

Alan Anderson

Moola Nyambe has traveled a long journey, both culturally and geographically, since her birth in the storied “Caprivi Strip,” which stretches northeastward out of Namibia like a crooked arm. She grew up in and near the isolated town of Katima Mulilo, which spreads along the banks of the Zambezi River just 130 miles above famed Victoria Falls, but 300 miles from the closest town in Namibia. As a girl, Moola explored the forests of the lush river banks that rang with the calls of tropical birds and monkeys.

Alan Anderson

During the years of Carnegie Corporation of New York support for RISE, the Science Initiative Group (SIG) has urged each of its five networks to plan for a future “beyond Carnegie” – to imagine sustainable forms of support, stronger links with the public and private sectors, perhaps even a new identity. While all of the network participants have taken steps in this direction, one node in particular – the AFNNET node in Uganda – has managed to do so in ways that are both consistent with its RISE academic heritage and practical enough to catch the attention of its own national government.

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