Blogs

Alan Anderson

Peregrine Sebulime, a PhD student at Makerere University, has been working on a project since 2009 that differs substantially from those chosen by his AFNNET peers. He is looking not primarily at questions of health care or environmental sustainability, but at the effects of a plant on meat production – specifically, the effects of Capsicum, a diverse genus of tropical pepper plants, on chicken meat.

Alan Anderson

When we posted our first blog entries for the Institute of Marine Sciences in Zanzibar, Siajali Pamba had just begun his PhD work there, under IMS director Prof. Alfonse Dubi. By now Pamba (he is called by his last name) is well along in his field research, and with Dr. Dubi’s departure, the advisory duties have moved to Dr. Yohana Shaghude and Prof. Alfred Muzuka. His topic, as he carefully explains, is to “investigate the transport and dispersion of suspended particulate matter.”

Alan Anderson

Gaolathe Tsheboeng, congenial and easygoing, had a smoother and more direct path into the RISE program than those who spent years searching for financial support while surviving on less stimulating work. Gaolathe, living in Gaborone, the capital of Botswana, heard about RISE just as he was finishing his BS degree at the University of Botswana and was quickly able to take advantage of it. He also differs from most of his peers in having earned a degree in education, rather than in science, though he did take a science emphasis.

Alan Anderson

Kelebogile “Kele” Cole entered the RISE program last year with powerful momentum – and from an unlikely background. Her family originated in Sierra Leone, but her grandfather, curious about the outside world, moved to the United States in search of a different life. After his curiosity was satisfied, he returned to Africa, settling in what is now Lesotho. One of his sons, Kele’s father, moved to Botswana, where he met Kele’s mother and settled down to raise his own family. Kele’s nickname is a remnant of that long-ago family foray to the States.

Alan Anderson

When Kondja Amutenya was growing up in northern Namibia, he was instructed early and often how important it would be to get a good education. His father, who worked in a diamond mine in the south, was virtually never home with his family. Kondja learned first-hand about another kind of life he did not care for – livestock herding. During every vacation from school, his mother dispatched him from his village of Uukuuvu-Onemanya to help his cousins look after the cattle, goats, donkeys, and other livestock at the family’s remote cattle post.

Alan Anderson

Moseki Motsholapheko entered the RISE program by an unusual route – from the field of environmental science (or human geography), and “from the inside.” He had been working as a social scientist at the Okavango Research Institute since 2000 as a research assistant, studying human adaptation to flooding.

Alan Anderson

Five RISE students have been part of an exciting transition at the Okavango Research Institute (ORI), in Maun, Botswana. As of October 1, 2010, the ORI (formerly the Okavango Research Center) attained the standing of a full Institute of the University of Botswana , and it is scheduled to become the University’s second campus by 2015. The RISE students are part of the first 15-member group of graduate students to work at ORI, after a multi-year effort by research leaders to bring them.

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