Latest News

June 2014

by Anita Makri, SciDev.Net

The ‘how’ might be contested but there’s agreement on one thing: universities need reform to help drive development.

Higher education is increasingly important to Africa’s drive fordevelopment and knowledge-based economies. Having more PhD holdersin research and teaching is widely seen as key to producing the intellectual power for this drive.

But it’s an uphill battle. After decades of donors and governments focusing investments on primary and secondary education, under-resourced universities struggle to keep researchers from seeking greener pastures abroad. 

Our Spotlight — part of a broader collaboration with the Carnegie Corporation of New York — throws some light on why producing more African academics is difficult and explores current thinking on how to make higher education work in Sub-Saharan Africa. 

The emphasis of this collection is on training with practical applications for development and employment — but this is not to underestimate therole of theoretical or other forms of knowledge, including basic researchand the humanities.

Article here.

June 2014

by Irene Friesenhahn, SciDev.Net

Irene Friesenhahn rounds up sources of online information, highlighting key initiatives on Africa’s higher education.

Several organisations address higher education in Africa through their work. The Carnegie Corporation of New York and UN agencies including UNESCO and the World Bank provide great online resources.

Article here.

June 2014

by Anita Makri, SciDev.Net

[DAR ES SALAAM] Quintino Mgani is professor of chemistry at the University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. He also coordinates the SABINA (Southern African Biochemistry and Informatics for Natural Products) network of the Regional Initiative in Science and Education (RISE), which is funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Mgani explains why PhD students need regional partnerships, how growth in Tanzania’s higher education sector undermines training capacity and what gets in the way of turning research into useful products.

This article is part of the Spotlight on Making higher education work for Africa.

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